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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
barack obama and hurricane sandy. bye-bye mitt. >> anyway, bye-bye mitt happened earlier than that. the 47% tape that was leaked that had him stating that he didn't have to carry about 47% of the public. also the decision to uphold most of obamacare was another defining political moment. >> when i share eleanor's view, i think that video of obama on that 47% of the american public whom he said were happily dependent on the american government -- >> romney. >> who did i say? >> obama. >> obama. definitely not obama. >> go ahead with it. >> but that -- i don't think romney did this with anticipation that it might suddenly come out. but when it came out, it was the worst political moment of his career. >> you think so. >> you can tell this is not rehearsed because i picked the 47% moment, too. it said so much about where the debate has gone. i think it's a turning point now. >> i will give you the true turning point. take this down. clarence, use it in your column. the most defining moment mitt romney's no show after the shore after it was hit hard by hurricane sandy. romney left the
close to $5 a gallon for gasoline, of course it was because of hurricane sandy and standing in line, gas lines, and now this. i know it is a special situation, but what is going on here? >> well, that was a special situation, it was incredible disruption of the supply chain to the northeast, if you recall, only northern new jersey had to endure the odd, even rationing it shows you how isolated that was, but what is going on here, suze is that the united states is in the process of becoming energy independent, it is in the process of surpassing saudi arabia as the world's number one producer of oil. because of the shale drilling that going on, mostly in the middle of the country. there is also a massive expansion of a big refinery down in texas, that the saudis are working on with royal dutch shell and the industry is refiguring the infrastructure zero to get more of that mid continent middle of the country oil down to the gulf coast where we could see a tremendous price break next year. >> that is really amazing stuff, let's look at some of the numbers on gas and oil and your outlook, i
automakers got a bump up in sales in november, thanks to super storm sandy. consumers postponed purchases when the hurricane hit in october, and resumed buying last month. but as diane eastabrook reports, the looming fiscal cliff could cause that sales momentum to lose traction. >> reporter: november turned out to be a good month for the big three and a great month for their foreign competitors. g.m. and ford both saw a modest uptick in vehicle sales last month-- while chrysler got a double digit boost. but competitors from europe and japan blew the domestics doors off. sales at v.w. were up just under 30%. while honda led the japanese pack with a sales increase of just under 40%. the car companies think super storm sandy pushed some sales the last weekend of october into november. morningstar auto analyst richard hilgert agrees sandy helped, but the storm wasn't the primary reason november was such a strong month. >> we've got a lot of pent up demand still out there-- pent up demand coming from, especially from the average age of the vehicles being over eleven years at this point in the
will that affect the outlook for next year. we'll ask b.m.o asset management's sandy lincoln. he's this week's "market monitor" guest. and why a new program to help student loan borrowers could mean a big win for high earners with graduate degrees. >> its medical marijuana business is a $2 billion a year industry already. it's projected to more than quad are you nell the next four years. but now colorado and washington state residents can use marijuana without a doctor's permission. while they are still breaking federal law, what impact could these new state laws have on the medical dope business? we have more of our recent conversation with tripp keber, c.e.o. of medical marijuana products maker dixie elixirs. >> you are looking at a $300 million in denver going to in excess of $600 million, this is about taxes, this is about jobs. the state of colorado we paid into a state coffers as an industry over $50 million in taxes, licenses and fees. we employ as an industry directly over 10,000 people in the state. and so there are not many states that can afford to turn a blind eye to that. so i c
sandy which obviously affected millions of people and really caught the public's imaginationment but it didn't end. coverage of other hurricanes h there is a beginning, a middle and an end. the fact is what sandy did or seems to have done is to take the idea of climate change from an abstraction, something that scientists and experts debated, to something that millions of people along the east coast and in manhattan and staten island and the other boroughs in new york city experienced for themselves and it started a debate. we don't know obviously what the long-term consequences are, but it does suggest there is something different about this story and its long-term implications. >> woodruff: and it's interesting, michael, because we've had big storms in this country before. >> sure. >> woodruff: but there was something different about this one? >> i think people are getting a little more alert to it politically. and one thing that historians of the future do is if something terrible happens, if climate change over the next 50 years or so achieve great injury to this earth, histo
of alcohol at all meals. >> rose: joining me now is celia sandys, winston churchill's granddaughter, david reynold-- renolds of cambridge university, peter clarke on the recently published mr. churchill's profession and i am pleased to have all of them here at this table. thank you. >> rose: i so looked forward to this i was go-going to tell a story that i once went to see christopher stones and he showed me something that he had received and had learned from winston churchill was how to diagram a speech, you know, in terms of indentation so that when you read it you read it win flexion and passion you know clearly about this is that what it said. >> he srt of sloped each paragraph. >> so you instantly had a sense to make the reading of it more as if you were simply coming from your heart. >> it is frankly boring to actually go when you set it out. and you don't have a secretary to do it, it's not so easy to make it. >> it's a lot of work but it is very much easier. >> was the love of language and words did it come early to churchill? >> i think so, he said that because he was a hi school
, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do you want it to be in the next five years? >> i think, charlie, what we've tried to do is simplify the portfolio into infrastructure and financial services. we like where the portfolio is today. we think in the infrastructure space there's going to be roughly $4 trillion spent each year, so it's an attractive big market. globally is where our opportunities are so the company's -- probably a decade ago 30% of our revenues were outside the united states. now it's more like 60% or 65%. so we think we've got the portfolio we want. we've dramatically increased the amount of technology. and in the end i think technology
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)